DAFWA Tomato-potato psyllid update

Tomato-potato psyllid Industry Update June 2018

The national Transition to management plan aimed to improve the capacity of the horticulture sector to manage TPP, and build confidence around the status of the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CLso) associated with TPP.

Transitioning to management followed national agreement TPP cannot be eradicated and efforts should focus on management.

The Transition to management plan was a national project seeking to benefit both Western Australia where TPP has been detected, and other states not yet managing TPP. The Western Australia Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development led the implementation of the plan, working closely with industry and the national TPP coordinator appointed through AUSVEG.

The plan included the following major activities:

  • Targeted surveillance for TPP/CLso complex during Spring 2017 and Autumn 2018 in WA
  • Scientific research to improve understanding of TPP, its biology and options for control
  • Management of TPP through the development of national and enterprise management plans
  • Market access and trade.

There have been no detections of CLso in Western Australia to date.

Other states around Australia have also implemented surveillance for TPP. To date, TPP has not been detected outside of Western Australia.

The department is currently compiling the results from the Transition to management plan and will make these available to growers, industries, and state and federal governments as soon as possible. Outcomes from the Transition to management plan will help inform future TPP/CLso research, development and management strategies.

For more information about the plan please contact the National TPP Coordinator, Alan Nankivell on +61 428 260 430  or alan.nankivell@ausveg.com.au.

Click here to view the full update.

 

Quarantine Area Notice

A new Quarantine Area Notice (QAN) with revised conditions is effective as of 1 November 2017. This replaces the previous QAN which expired on 31 October 2017.

The QAN was developed in consultation with WA’s horticultural industry and applies to commercially-produced and home-grown host plants or nursery stock grown within the Quarantine Area. The new QAN refines and simplifies previous control measures, and aims to minimise the spread of TPP in Western Australia.

Prescribed treatment is required for host plants, such as seedlings or nursery stock, where they are moving from the Quarantine Area to Specified local government areas in Western Australia.

The Quarantine Area includes the Perth metropolitan area and a number of local government areas. See the full list here.

 

Check and report

Commercial growers are encouraged to continue to check for, and report sightings of unusual insects or damage to their plants through the MyPestGuide reporter app or by contracting the department on 1800 084 881

Good farm biosecurity procedures should be in place to prevent the entry, establishment and spread of pests and diseases. More information on biosecurity is available at the Farm Biosecurity website.

For more information on any issues relating to the TPP incursion, please see the DAFWA website.

 

Advice for growers

TPP can spread through the movement of tomato, capsicum, eggplant, tamarillo and other solanaceous plant material. It can also occur on other hosts including the Convolvulaceae plant family, including sweetpotato, and can disperse through natural pathways such as flight and on the wind. All Western Australian growers of affected crops should check their plants for TPP. More information about the psyllid and the bacterium, including photos to assist with identification, are available on DAFWA’s website.

Any suspected detection of TPP needs to be reported using the Exotic Plant Pest Hotline on

1800 084 881 or using DAFWA’s MyPestGuide reporting app.

If you suspect you have seen the psyllid outside of Western Australia, you need to contact your state or territory department of agriculture or primary industries. This can be done by phoning the Exotic Plant Pest Hotline on 1800 084 881.

As a general reminder, all growers need to practice sound farm biosecurity to prevent the entry, establishment and spread of pests and diseases. Find out more here.

 

Interstate trade/market access

For more information on interstate trade/market access, click here.

Dickeya dianthicola

 

Dickeya dianthicola is a serious bacterium that can cause tuber soft rot and blackleg in potatoes, and can also affect some ornamental varieties, chicory and artichoke.

The bacteria was detected in Australia, for the first time, in June 2017 on a Western Australian commercial potato property. In addition to seed potatoes, the bacteria has since been found in dahlia tubers and freesia bulbs imported from Victoria.

Growers of these crops are urged to check plants and tubers, and report any suspect symptoms.

 

What is Dickeya dianthicola

Dickeya dianthicola causes soft rot and blackleg in potatoes. It is a serious pest (bacterium) that was not previously known to occur in Australia. Overseas data has indicated significant yield losses in potato crops.

Dickeya dianthicola can also infect other crops, including some ornamentals (including carnation, lily, chrysanthemum, dahlia, begonia, flaming Katy, freesia, hyacinth and iris), globe arichoke and chicory.

Other pathogens already present in Australia can cause similar soft rot and blackleg symptoms. However, Dickeya dianthicola is more aggressive and causes disease at lower infection levels.

This pest is not associated with the tomato potato psyllid.

 

Current response

The Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD), in conjunction with the Western Australian potato industry, will implement a management strategy for Dickeya dianthicola following a national decision that it cannot be eradicated.

The National Management Group (NMG) decision that the pest is not technically feasible to eradicate is based on the recommendation provided by the Consultative Committee on Emergency Plant Pests.

Quarantine restrictions on five commercial properties in WA have been lifted.

Further tracing activities are being undertaken in Victoria, New South Wales, South Australia and WA, including testing of available potato tubers, dahlia tubers in Victoria and WA, and freesia bulbs from Victoria.

The Potato Growers Association of WA (PGAWA) will lead management efforts to minimise industry impacts. This will include raising grower awareness of buyer responsibility to understand the risks of spread.

DPIRD will provide technical advice, fee for service laboratory testing and will work with PGAWA to modify the Certified Seed Scheme and Registration Rules to manage the disease.

There are currently no additional interstate trade restrictions being considered for potatoes apart from those restrictions in place for the tomato potato psyllid.

The international market access for WA potatoes remains unaffected.

Trade in cut flowers from WA is already subject to interstate movement conditions for other pests.

The Australian Government Department of Agriculture and Water Resources will work with overseas trading partners should any issues arise.

The bacterium does not have an impact on human health.

For more information, visit the DPIRD website.

 

Host list

  • Potatoes
  • Globe artichoke
  • Chicory
  • Begonia
  • Calla lily
  • Carnation
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Dahlia
  • Dianthus, Sweet William
  • Freesia
  • Hyacinth
  • Iris
  • Kalanchoe, ‘Flaming Katy’ which is also known as ‘Christmas kalanchoe’, ‘florist kalanchoe’ and ‘Madagascar widow’s thrill’

 

Symptoms

The first symptom of the disease can be poor emergence due to rotting seed tubers. Plants wilt and typically have slimy, wet, black stems extending upwards from the rotting tuber.

Infected tubers are macerated and have a tapioca-like appearance, but may not have the pungent smell associated with typical blackleg.

According to overseas data, Dickeya dianthicola can also cause soft rot and wilting in ornamental crops.

Dickeya dianthicola can be present in a plant without causing symptoms, particularly if temperatures remain low. Symptoms often develop after a period of hot weather, especially when plants are also stressed.

 

How does it spread?

In potatoes, it is generally accepted the main source for blackleg infection is latently infected seed tubers.

Overseas data indicates that as infected tubers rot, the bacterium is released into the soil. It can then be transmitted through water in the soil and contaminates neighbouring tubers, and infected stems can also affect neighbouring plants through contaminated irrigation water.

Additionally, infection has been shown to spread to other tubers during storage. Overseas research indicates that Dickeya dianthicola does not survive long in soil without a host. Although bacteria can survive between potato crops in soil when there is remaining plant debris or when volunteer potatoes are present.

 

Management options

Generalised management techniques developed for soft rot diseases in potatoes may be useful for growers affected by Dickeya dianthicola. Refer to the soft rot web pages for further information.

Additionally, on-farm biosecurity practices, such as good farm hygiene and early reporting of suspicious symptoms should be in place to prevent the entry, establishment and spread of pests and diseases. Practical advice and information to assist is available through the Farm Biosecurity website farmbiosecurity.com.au

 

Reporting options

Dickeya dianthicola (Samson et al. 2005) is a prohibited organism for Western Australia. It is important any suspect disease occurrences are reported.

Growers can report any unusual plant symptoms by:

  • Calling the Pest and Disease Information Service on 1800 084 881, or
  • Sending a photo to DPIRD via the MyPestGuide Reporter app available from the Google Play or Apple store, or
  • Emailing photos with your name, address and mobile number to info@agric.wa.gov.au

Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB)

The brown marmorated stink bug is a high priority pest which is known to arrive in Australia in cargo coming from the northern hemisphere between September and April each year.

BMSB feeds on more than 300 host crops. Preferred vegetable crops include capsicums, sweet corn, okra, tomatoes, green beans, eggplant and others. The pest is native to eastern Asia but has been introduced to parts of North America and Europe.

The brown marmorated stink bug has been detected in imported cargo at two sites in Western Sydney and a commercial premises in Perth. The goods were imported from Italy.

The first detection occurred in Glendenning, Western Sydney in November 2017. The second detection occurred in January 2018 in Horsley Park, Western Sydney. No further BMSB were found during trapping and surveillance activities at both sites and monitoring is being undertaken on a weekly basis by the NSW Department of Primary Industries to confirm that BMSB is not present.

The third detection occurred in February 2018 at a commercial establishment in Jandakot, Perth. The infested goods were treated by the department and the establishment was fumigated. The Western Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development has set traps in the vicinity of the establishment.

 

Department of Agriculture and Water Resources Import industry advice notices

23 July 2018 – Draft measures for 2018-19 Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) risk season

 

Who does this notice affect?

Clients in the import and shipping industries—including freight forwarders, importers and customs brokers—associated with importing goods that require increased intervention during the BMSB risk season (shipped between 1 September 2018 and 30 April 2019 inclusive).

What has changed?

To manage the risk posed by BMSB to Australia, the department mandates heightened measures during the BMSB risk season for goods shipped to Australia between 1 September and 30 April inclusive.

For the 2018-19 BSMB risk season, the department has expanded the list of countries that will be subject to heightened measures. The additional countries are France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Romania and Russia. Italy and the United States of America will also continue to be subject to the seasonal measures.

Under the measures, certain risk goods manufactured in, or shipped as sea cargo from, these countries will be subject to increased onshore intervention. Mandatory offshore treatment will also apply to certain high risk goods manufactured in, or shipped from, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Romania, Russia, and the United States of America. Goods that require mandatory offshore treatment and arrive untreated or treated by an unapproved treatment provider will be exported or destroyed, unless exceptional circumstances are granted.

The department is currently reviewing the range of goods including tariffs that will be subject to heightened measures. A draft list of the target goods is available on the BMSB web page. The range of goods will be finalised in late July 2018.

In addition to the measures above, heightened vessel surveillance will be conducted on all roll-on/roll-off (ro-ro) and general cargo vessels with pre-arrival reporting through a questionnaire and daily checks for presence of BMSB. Vessels identified as high risk from the surveillance will be directed for inspection, treatment or other directions. This measure will apply to vessels from France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Romania, Russia, and the United States of America.

Offshore treatment providers – application form now available

All treatment providers in France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Romania, Russia and the United States of America that intend to conduct BMSB treatments must register under the Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme (the scheme). The application form for the scheme is now available on the BMSB web page.

Treatment providers in other countries who intend to conduct BMSB treatments for goods that are manufactured in France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Romania, Russia, Italy or the Unites States of America are also encouraged to complete the application form.

Treatment certificates from providers in non-target risk countries who do not register will be accepted and goods may be subject to onshore verification.

Treatment providers in non-target risk countries who perform more than three BMSB treatments during the season must join the Offshore BMSB Treatment Providers Scheme. After an unapproved provider’s third certificate is received, future treated goods may be exported or destroyed, unless exceptional circumstances are granted.

The department will add treatment providers who meet our requirements to our approved list of offshore treatment providers.
Clients who used an offshore treatment provider in the 2017–18 season are requested to inform them of the application process.

Further information

For further information regarding BMSB measures, visit the BMSB web page or contact Air and Sea Cargo.

 

8 March 2018 – Brown Marmorated Stink Bug risk season 2017-18

 

Who does this notice affect?

This notice is of interest to clients in the import and shipping industries, including importers and customs brokers, associated with the importation of Italian goods during the BMSB risk season (goods shipped between 1 September 2017 to 30 April 2018 inclusive).

What has changed?

The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (the department) has found significant numbers of BMSB on arrival in Australia in various types of goods arriving from Italy. The department has recently reviewed the risk of failed offshore treatments of goods shipped via sea cargo from Italy with detections of live insects including BMSB.

To manage the risk posed by these goods, any sulfuryl fluoride treatment certificates issued by ANY Italian treatment provider that is presented to the department from 9 March 2018 will no longer be accepted. Any Italian goods shipped on or before 30 April 2018 will be required to undergo an approved BMSB treatment onshore unless they have been treated offshore using an approved BMSB treatment. Treatment certificates for approved BMSB treatments, other than sulfuryl fluoride, from Italy will still be accepted.

Exceptions from onshore BMSB treatment continues to apply to goods already treated with one of the approved offshore BMSB treatments, or that fall within one of the excluded tariff groups:

  • Fresh produce (including nursery stock and live plants)
  • Live animals
  • Food for human consumption (including beverages)
  • Seeds for sowing
  • Registered pharmaceuticals

All other goods (FCL, FCX and LCL) arriving from Italy (including new and unused goods), including those already en route to Australia, will require treatment on arrival using methyl bromide, or another approved treatment for BMSB. These measures are in addition to existing import requirements. The department will inspect randomly selected containers post treatment to validate treatment effectiveness and to collect intelligence to determine future measures.

Due to increased risk measures, profiles have been created to refer relevant entries to AIMS. Brokers must lodge all documentation relating to the consignment into the COLS system and ensure that all documents meet the department’s documentary requirements. As the department is no longer accepting goods treated with sulfuryl fluoride from Italy, there is no requirement to record the AEI for these sulfuryl fluorides treatment certificates.

Importers shipping consignments to Australia during the BMSB risk season should ensure their stakeholders are aware of the risk of BMSB infestation and the importance of preventing infestation prior to shipping.

When deconsolidating goods, care should be taken to inspect locations where BMSB may congregate, including crevices or protected areas of shipping containers, inside the goods, or within packaging material. If BMSB are detected, operators and staff must follow normal procedures to secure goods to limit any movement of insects and notify the department immediately.

Similarly, importers who detect live BMSB must secure and contain the goods and contact the department immediately.

If you see something that could have entered Australia with imported goods report it to See. Secure. Report. on 1800 798 636 or complete the online form.

 

30 January 2018 – Commencement of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Vessel Assessment and Inspection Arrangements 2018

 

Who does this notice affect?

This notice is of interest to relevant shipping agents, international vessel masters and international vessel operators of roll-on/roll-off (ro-ro) vessels.

What has changed?

The heightened vessel surveillance window for BMSB has commenced. On 31 January 2018 the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (the department) will commence the management of BMSB risk on ro-ro vessels arriving in Australia through the Maritime Arrivals Reporting System (MARS). This activity is expected to conclude at the end of the BMSB risk season, on 30 April 2018.

Ro-ro vessels arriving in an Australian seaport during the 2018 BMSB season will be risk assessed by the department to determine the need for a targeted BMSB inspection on arrival. All relevant vessels will be sent a BMSB questionnaire via MARS, as part of the pre-arrival reporting process.

Once the questionnaire is completed and returned to the Maritime National Coordination Centre (MNCC) and assessed, vessels will be notified via the Biosecurity Status Document if a targeted BMSB inspection is required as part of their first port arrival formalities.

Vessels found with suspected BMSB contamination during inspection may be directed to treat any cargo discharged at the first port. Further directions may be applied to treat the vessel prior to cargo discharge at a subsequent port.

Vessel masters should remain vigilant for exotic insects and report detections to the department. The department has developed a pest alert brochure to assist vessel masters and crew to detect hitchhiking pests of biosecurity concern, such as BMSB. More information about BMSB can be found on the departmental website.

The activities of assessment and inspection for seasonal pests, such as BMSB, are chargeable in accordance with the department’s Charging Guidelines.

 

16 January 2018 – Brown Marmorated Stink Bug risk season 2017-18

 

Who does this notice affect?

Clients in the import and shipping industries – including importers and customs brokers – associated with importing containerised goods from Italy during the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) risk season (1 September 2017 to 30 April 2018 inclusive).

What has changed?

The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources (the department) has found significant numbers of BMSB on arrival in Australia in various types of containerised goods arriving from Italy. These detections indicate that BMSB are sheltering in a range of containers and goods outside of those captured by existing measures.

To manage the risk posed by these goods, all containerised goods shipped via sea cargo from Italy that arrive in Australia between 17 January 2018 and 30 April 2018 will be required to undergo an approved treatment onshore. Refer to the BMSB webpage for information about approved treatments for this pest.

Goods already treated offshore with one of the approved BMSB treatments, and where a valid treatment certificate is presented to the department, will not require further treatment.

Exceptions from treatment also apply to goods that fall within one of the excluded tariff groups:

  • Fresh produce (including nursery stock and live plants)
  • Live animals
  • Food for human consumption
  • Seeds for sowing

All other containerised goods (FCL, FCX and LCL) arriving from Italy (including new and unused goods), including those already en route to Australia, will require treatment on arrival using methyl bromide, or another approved treatment for BMSB. These measures are in addition to existing import requirements. The department will inspect randomly selected containers post treatment to validate treatment effectiveness and to collect intelligence to determine future measures.

Due to increased risk measures, profiles have been created to refer relevant entries to AIMS. Brokers must lodge all documentation relating to the consignment into the COLS system and ensure that all documents meet the department’s documentary requirements.

Lodging documents in COLS:

  • Use the Enquiry/Declaration function
  • Select Enquiry Type Quarantine document processing
  • Attach all documents relating to the consignment
  • Regardless if goods are exempt, brokers must nominate a valid Approved Arrangement (AA) fumigation location, preferably with the AA registration number and name, in the Enquiry Information field.

Importers shipping consignments to Australia during the BMSB risk season should ensure their stakeholders are aware of the risk of BMSB infestation and the importance of preventing infestation prior to shipping.

When deconsolidating goods, care should be taken to inspect locations where BMSB may congregate, including crevices or protected areas of shipping containers, inside the goods, or within packaging material. If BMSB are detected, operators and staff must follow normal procedures to secure goods to limit any movement of insects and notify the department immediately.

If you see something that could have entered Australia with imported goods report it to See. Secure. Report. on 1800 798 636 or complete the online form.

 

3 October 2017 – Brown Marmorated Stink Bug risk season 2017-18

 

Who does this notice affect?

This notice is of interest to clients operating an Approved Arrangement (AA) site that receives specific goods from the United States or Italy during the highest risk period for BMSB, from 1 September 2017 to 30 April 2018 inclusive.

What has changed?

The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources has implemented additional measures every year since 2014 to manage the seasonal risk of BMSB infestations in sea cargo arriving at Australian ports.

While the measures previously applied to at-risk goods from the United States, the spread of this pest has resulted in the measures being extended this season to similar goods from Italy, and other European ports if the goods were manufactured or stored in Italy during the risk period.  New and used vehicles, vessels, machinery and large machinery parts are the primary pathway for these goods at this stage.  The department is also monitoring imports from other European countries where BMSB is known to be established.

AA operators and staff are asked to be extra vigilant for the presence of these insects when unpacking goods from the Northern Hemisphere during the BMSB risk season.  The season coincides with the period when the insects actively seeking shelter from winter conditions in homes, buildings, vehicles, machinery, often in large numbers.

AA operators and staff are also asked to pay extra attention when unpacking consignments of the following commodities:

  • Kiwi fruit originating from Italy
  • Unaccompanied personal effects from the US and Europe.

Particular care should be paid when deconsolidating goods to locations where BMSB may congregate, including crevices or protected areas of shipping containers, on or inside the target goods, or within packaging material for these goods. If the insects are detected AA operators should follow normal procedures to secure the goods to limit any movement of the insects and notify the department immediately of the detection.

If you see something that could have entered Australia with imported goods report it to See. Secure. Report. line on 1800 798 636 or complete the online form.

Further information

For further information on the 2017-18 measures, please see the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug web page or contact Air and Sea Cargo.
Any changes to the 2017-18 measures will be published in industry advice notices and via social media. To receive advice of changes, go to Subscription centre to request an email when a new industry notice is issued, or go to the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources’ twitter account, @DeptAgNews.

 

17 August 2017 – Brown Marmorated Stink Bug risk season 2017-18

 

Who does this notice affect?

This notice is of interest to clients in the import and shipping industries, including importers and customs brokers associated with the importation of targeted break bulk and vehicles, boats, machinery and machinery parts from 1 September 2017 to 30 April 2018 inclusive.

What has changed?

The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources has developed measures to manage the 2017‑18 seasonal risk of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) infestations in sea cargo shipped from the United States and on high risk pathways originating in Europe.

The 2017-18 BMSB measures will continue to apply to target goods arriving from the United States, and will now include target goods from Italy shipped from 1 September 2017 to 30 April 2018 inclusive. The target goods season dates, treatments, and requirements for management of target goods are unchanged.

In addition, heightened inspections will apply to target goods from other European countries where BMSB is known to be established in order to monitor emerging risk of importation of BMSB on those pathways.

The 2017-18 measures will remain in place for the entire season unless further significant pest infestations are detected. Should this occur, the department may impose emergency requirements similar to those implemented during the 2014-15 season. The department will continue to monitor the risk of brown marmorated stink bugs from other parts of the world and will develop measures accordingly if required.

The above revised measures are based on current understanding of the pest’s biology, interception data and learning from last season’s measures.

Further information

For further information on the 2017-18 measures, please see the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug web page or contact Air and Sea Cargo.

Any changes to the 2017-18 measures will be published in import industry advice notices and via social media. To receive advice of changes, go to the Subscription centre to request an email when a new industry notice is issued, or go to the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources’ twitter account, @DeptAgNews.

CaLsol detection in imported parsley seed (NSW)

Current Situation

A bacterial plant pathogen, Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (CaLsol), has been detected in the Italian Giant variety of imported parsley seed. These seeds originated in France. However, they were imported through a supplier in Italy.

The bacterium does not often damage parsley plants but if spread, it may cause serious damage to Apiaceae crops including carrot, celery, chervil, fennel and parsnip.

Whilst this disorder is also spread by psyllids, these particular psyllids are not present in Australia, and it is not spread by the tomato-potato psyllid recently detected in Western Australia. This detection of the bacterium in parsley is not to be confused with zebra chip disease in potatoes, which is associated with the tomato-potato psyllid. Zebra chip is not known to occur in Australia.

Australia introduced emergency measures in April 2017, following detection in celery, parsley and parsnip seed overseas. Subsequently, seeds entering Australia require seed testing or hot water treatment prior to entry.

The parsley seeds in question were imported prior to the implementation of emergency measures in April 2017. This is the first time this bacterium has been detected in Australia. Currently, the NSW Department of Primary Industries is tracing the distribution of the seeds within NSW and to other jurisdictions, which will give an indication of their overall distribution.

 

The disease

CaLsol presents various symptoms:

Carrot – Leaf yellowing, bronze/red discolouration in the leaf, reduction in root size, root proliferation.

Celery – abnormal number of shoots, stem curling, yellowing.

Parsley and parsnip – yellowing, proliferation, redness of leaves.

Parsley grown from infected seeds does not pose a threat to human health. It is safe to eat.

 

Biosecurity and reporting

The Australian Government advises home gardeners to harvest and eat their parsley before it goes to seed.

If you are a plant wholesaler or obtained imported Italian Giant parsley seed before April 2017, contact your local department of primary industries or biosecurity agency through the Exotic Plant Pest Hotline on 1800 084 881.

It is important for commercial growers and home gardeners to be vigilant for new plant pests or disease symptoms.

Impatiens necrotic spot virus

Impatiens necrotic spot virus is an exotic plant pest which can infect more than 600 plant species, including many vegetable crops. The virus has similar biology to Tomato spotted wilt virus, which is widespread in Australia. Impatiens necrotic spot virus is not seed borne, however, it can be spread by western flower thrips (WFT), which are established in most states and territories across Australia. WFT larvae obtain the virus when they feed on infected host plants. Adult WFT then transmit the virus to healthy plants by direct feeding for 5-30 minutes. Other thrips have not been identified as vectors of Impatiens necrotic spot virus.

Symptoms of plants infected by Impatiens necrotic spot virus include stunted plant growth, ringspots, brown or purple spots on leaves or stems, plant death and others. Nevertheless, symptoms may vary between plants and some plants may be asymptomatic.

Recently, Impatiens necrotic spot virus was detected in lettuce on a farm near Camden in the Sydney basin. The virus was detected in Batavia lettuce and two varieties of Cos lettuce. It is unclear how the virus became introduced to the vegetable farm.

The NSW DPI is responding to the detection, implementing measures on the infected farm to limit the spread of the virus. Their efforts include programs for WFT and weed control. The department is also inspecting nearby farms for the virus.

If you think that your crop might be infected with Impatiens necrotic spot virus, contact the Exotic Plant Pest Hotline on 1800 084 881.

For more information on the virus, visit the NSW DPI website.